• Course Delivery
    100% Online
  • Total Credits
    36
  • In-State Tuition Per Credit
    $278.00
  • Out of State Tuition Per Credit
    $278.00
Our RN-BSN program is designed for working registered nurses who hold an Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN). Students must have an unencumbered registered nursing license to qualify for this program. Expand your leadership skills, transitional care knowledge,  and your career opportunities by adding a Bachelor of Science in Nursing to your Registered Nurse licensure. The RN-BSN program at the UMKC School of Nursing and Health Studies is a nationally recognized fully online degree that stands out for its use of technology, faculty engagement, excellent student outcomes,  student satisfaction, and excellent preparation for the MSN, DNP and/or PhD studies. One feature that sets the UMKC RN-BSN program apart from other completion programs is the integration of rural, urban and suburban nurses coming together to explore issues relevant to health care and the nursing profession. The program is designed to hone the professional development of RNs to become leaders, managers, coordinators, advocates and designers of care. During the final year of the RN-BSN curriculum, student teams work collaboratively with RN-BSN supervisory practice experience faculty, healthcare organizations or healthcare-related entities to design and implement team-directed practice experiences. The process is created to empower you to assume a leadership role in improving health care.
Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE) accredited, Higher Learning Commission (HLC) accredited & HLC certified for distance education delivery

Admissions & Requirements

To be accepted to this program, you must have:

  1. Graduation from a state board of nursing-approved school of nursing. Students requesting admission to the BSN program who are graduates of diploma or non-accredited ADN programs may be admitted on provisional status.
  2. Current unencumbered licensure as a registered nurse in the United States.
  3. Cumulative Grade Point Average of 2.5 (4.0 scale) from the basic school of nursing and all previous and subsequent college coursework. Students applying with a cumulative GPA ranging from 2.0 to 2.499 may be admitted on probation based on review of individual circumstances.
NOTE: Individuals residing in AL, TN or WA are not able to enroll in this program.

To apply to this program:

Apply Now

Application Deadlines

Rolling admissions. Application review will begin upon receipt of all required application materials.

Courses

Core
  • DISC 100 OR ENGLISH 110Discourse I: Reasoning and Values (Speech and Writing) OR English I: Introduction To Academic Prose3 Credits

    “Discourse” refers to the language, images, styles, genres, behaviors and other forms of communication used by specific social and professional groups. The techniques of discourse analysis and language awareness taught in this course will enable you to position yourself socially and professionally, helping you understand the discourse conventions, reasoning, and "commonsense" assumptions that create and define academic, political, professional, and other discourse formations and communities. Students will produce, perform, and analyze college-level, oral and written texts; and they will learn how written and oral performances function together in specific discourse communities. OR This course introduces students to college-level reading, writing, and discourse analysis: it engages students in the analysis and creation of texts that reveal multiple perspectives about specific rhetorical situations and cultural issues. In addition to learning how to revise by analyzing their own writing, students will learn to edit their own work and use proper academic documentation.

  • DISC 200 OR ENGLISH 225 OR COMM-ST 110Discourse II: Culture and Diversity (Writing and Speech) OR English II: Intermediate Academic Prose OR Fundamentals Of Effective Speaking And Listening3 Credits

    Students will produce, perform, and analyze college-level, oral and written texts that are based on sustained academic research. Students will continue to develop their understanding of discourse analysis and language awareness in the context of a range of discursive forms. Students will interpret and synthesize college-level scholarship that addresses how diverse discourse communities define, evaluate, and transform individual, institutional, and cultural identities. This course is associated with the anchor course Culture and Diversity and prepares studentsfor DISC 300. OR This course extends the work of ENGLISH 110 with an additional emphasis on research. Each section of ENGLISH 225 uses a combination of book-length and shorter texts on focus on specific historical and/or cultural issues. As they learn to participate in scholarly conversations, students will find and evaluate library and internet sources. As with ENGLISH 110, this course emphasizes revision, editing, and proper academic documentation. ENGLISH 225 or equivalent is a prerequisite for all 300 and 400 level ENGLISH courses.

  • HISTORY 101 OR HISTORY 102 OR POL-SCI 210U.S. History to 1877 OR U.S. History Since 1877 OR American Government3 Credits

    This course offers a broad survey of American history up to 1877. OR This course covers American history from the end of Reconstruction to the present. OR American government and politics, with special reference to the U.S. Constitution. This course meets the state requirement for study of the U.S. and Missouri Constitutions.

  • N345Quant. Analysis in the Health Sciences3 Credits

    This course focuses upon the skills required for the utilization of scientific findings in evidence-based care. The conceptual basis of descriptive and the inferential statistics found in the properties of the normal distribution, comprise the core of these skills. Using the normal distribution as a structure for understanding descriptive and inferential procedures, the course presents information necessary to the selection, computation and interpretation of basic statistics relevant to evidence based-care in the health sciences. Discussions of variables, measurement and tabular and graphic presentation of data precede the development of computation skills.

  • N395Pathophysiology3 Credits

    This course will focus on alterations in biological processes that affect the body’s internal homeostasis. A conceptual approach will be used to emphasize general principles of pathophysiology. The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, and sequelae of various alterations of human structure and function will be examined. Knowledge from the basic and clinical sciences will be integrated.

  • N401Health Assessment3 Credits

    This course is designed to provide a systematic approach to the physiological, psychological, socio-cultural and developmental assessment of individuals emphasizing findings considered to be within normal limits. The health history is emphasized as a tool for assessing mental and physical status. This course is designed for students with previous health care education, including knowledge of biochemical functions of systems and concepts of normal. This course consists of guided self-study and a virtual clinical practicum.

  • N417Info. Systems and Tech. for Healthcare3 Credits

    This course provides a basic introduction to health information technology across health care settings. Students will acquire an understanding of key concepts associated with health informatics and network models, systems and management strategies, health information strategic planning, clinical and public health application, data retrieval and analytics, public policy, research, and one’s professional responsibility to protect electronic health care records.

  • N476Scientific Inquiry3 Credits

    This course focuses upon the development of inquiry skills necessary to identify relevant research-based literature and apply findings from research to practice. Students will develop an understanding of basic research concepts and evidence based practice in addition to skills in finding, appraising, and using health related literature.

  • N481Tools for Personal Effectiveness6 Credits

    This is the first in the four-course sequence. The student will discover that the foundation for professional nursing practice is personal effectiveness. Personal effectiveness is contingent upon an understanding of the historical roots of the profession, the meaning of professionalism, image and power bases, professional standards, moral development, political role socialization and professional values. Personal effectiveness is enhanced through critical reflection of personal perspectives and biases, valuing and use of theory and research, critical thinking and decision-making, informatics' technology, the ability to manage time and stress, and the use of a career plan and informatics.

  • N482Tools for Interpersonal Effectiveness: Disc. 3003 Credits

    This is the second in the four-course sequence. The student will discover that interpersonal effectiveness is a prerequisite to effective management of the care of humans and of teams. Interpersonal effectiveness is contingent on an understanding of professional value and caring, ethics in health care, legalities of practice, communication theories, and the dynamics of groups and teams. Interpersonal effectiveness is enhanced through the use of such skills as conflict resolution and negotiation, delegation, managing change, advocacy, team membership, group management, political awareness, technology utilization, and communication techniques. Content appropriate to these areas will be covered within this course.

  • N483Effectiveness in Human Health Outcomes6 Credits

    This is the third in a four-course sequence. It builds upon the personal and interpersonal skills acquired in the first two block courses and focuses on effectiveness in human health outcomes. The student will discover that effectiveness in human health outcomes is a primary goal in the delivery of an optimum continuum of health care that encompasses health promotion, disease prevention and illness care across the lifespan. Achieving effectiveness in human health outcomes across the wellness-illness continuum and the individual-to-community continuum is contingent on acquiring an understanding of epidemiology, levels of care, communicable disease control, case management, theories applicable to aggregate populations, cultural competence, evidence-based care, and information technology.

  • N484Effectiveness in Complex Health Systems6 Credits

    This is the final course in the four-course sequence. Students will build upon the knowledge and skills acquired in the prior three course in order to examine the essentials of structure and designs, behavior and culture, synergy, workplace diversity, health care finance, and power and politics within complex health systems. Organizational theories, leadership, management and nursing's social responsibility in an emerging global health care environment will also be explored.

  • N485Application to Practice I: Anchor 3003 Credits

    This is the first of two clinical application courses designed to complement didactic content from the four-course block sequence (NURSE 481 - NURSE 484). Students will integrate an increasingly complex knowledge base with an emphasis on developing effectiveness: personally, interpersonally, and in the health management of populations of clients within systems of community and professional organizations and practice settings. Student cohort groups, in collaboration with personnel from health related organizations and faculty, assess population health needs, identify outcomes and develop action plans based on real need. The practice experience learning processes and outcomes will be collective and provide solutions for the health care community.

  • N486Application to Practice II3 Credits

    This is the second of two Practicum application courses designed to complement didactic content from the four-course block sequence (NURSE 481 - NURSE 484) to integrate complex knowledge for personal and interpersonal development in the health management of populations of clients. Student cohort teams will apply new skills and knowledge to real issues and problems in the delivery of nursing care with an emphasis on teamwork performance and action plan implementation and outcome evaluation. The processes and outcomes of those experiences will be collaborative and provide solutions for the health care community.

  • PHILOS 210Introduction to Philosophy3 Credits

    An introduction to many of the central problems of philosophy. The various dimensions of philosophy are examined as it related to our relationships with each other, our understanding of our world and our understanding of ourselves. Connections between classical philosophers and contemporary issues are explored as philosophy is considered as a deeply personal and also as a social phenomenon.

Tuition & Fees

Missouri Resident Fee Rates
  • Per Credit Hour
  • Tuition: $278.00
  • Fees: $59.10
  • Total: $337.10
  • 3 Credit Hours
  • Tuition: $834.00
  • Fees: $177.30
  • Total: $1011.30
Missouri Non-Resident Fee Rates
  • Per Credit Hour
  • Tuition: $278.00
  • Fees: $59.10
  • Total: $337.10
  • 3 Credit Hours
  • Tuition: $834.00
  • Fees: $177.30
  • Total: $1011.30
Missouri Midwest Exchange Fee Rates
  • Per Credit Hour
  • Tuition: $278.00
  • Fees: $59.10
  • Total: $337.10
  • 3 Credit Hours
  • Tuition: $834.00
  • Fees: $177.30
  • Total: $1011.30
Metro Fee Rates
  • Per Credit Hour
  • Tuition: $278.00
  • Fees: $59.10
  • Total: $337.10
  • 3 Credit Hours
  • Tuition: $834.00
  • Fees: $177.30
  • Total: $1011.30
Tuition rates are subject to change.

What's it like to take a program online?

  • Earn a quality education online

    With more than 100 online programs to choose from across our four campuses, our online students have incredible access to career-advancing education. Our online courses are developed and taught by the same excellent faculty and instructors who teach the courses on campus. Whether you’re looking for an undergraduate education, graduate education, or a certificate program to further your career, one of our four campuses has an option to fit your needs.

  • Learning that fits your schedule

    Online learning provides students with the flexibility and freedom to attend classes whenever and wherever you are, in a way that is convenient for you. You can save time and money by being able to continue working and by avoiding relocation, travel and commuting costs. Courses must be completed in scheduled time frames, but in most cases, you can log in and complete course work whenever doing so best fits your schedule. Online education means learning on your terms – not the other way around.

  • Service you expect from a renowned University

    Our goal is to provide our online students with an excellent academic experience, without forcing you to make sacrifices in other areas of your life.

Want to learn more?